Contemplating Brand Synergy


November 27, 2014

by Gracia Ventus

Rick Owens via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

Brand Synergy. What on earth is brand synergy? It’s not an entirely new phrase in the world of Marketing. Simply put it’s combining the strength of two brands to create a much stronger impact or influence on the consumers by multiple folds, ie. 2 + 2 = 5, or 10, or 30, etc. One example would be like putting Doctor Who and Sherlock in a single movie. The Anglophiles are bound to wet themselves to no end.

In the world of fashion however, it has become a buzz phrase that has been thrown a lot in various fashion forums, albeit without quite the same connotation. More often than not it refers to how well a brand ‘fits’ with another in an outfit, eg. Comme des Garçons with Yohji Yamamoto. I’m not hypothesising as this matter has been brought up in my presence on numerous occasions. ‘Does Rick go with SLP?’, would be a commonly asked question, as if one was putting on a playlist, making sure that the BPM matched closely to ensure smooth transitions between songs. In short, synergising brands is the act of trying to ensure that the visions and aesthetics of the brands included in a single outfit/wardrobe are coherent and complementary.

Rick Owens via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde FashionRick Owens via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

I suppose the main draw of subscribing to the theory of brand synergy allows one to limit purchases within a certain circle of labels, removing most of the hassle of matching one’s clothes. However that limitation can also be a drawback. Should one find themselves fancying a garment that contradicts one’s chosen aesthetics, cognitive dissonance is most likely to occur. ‘Do I get this and let it collect dust in my closet? But I’d really love to wear this magnificent Thom piece. I may have to get the other Thom pieces. Or attempt to wear them with my Cavallis. Why is fashunz so hard OMG!?”

Opponents of brand synergy argue that subscribing to a stringent formula usually result in looking like the real life manifestation of a lookbook. And we know that in the highest tier of online fashunz, you’d be banished to the pariah class faster than you can say ‘Hood by Air’.

Personally I find that both extreme viewpoints aren’t quite beneficial to our fashion enjoyment. Indeed there’s a need for us to curate, but it doesn’t have to be done according to a strict formula of labels. Like it or not there will be instances in which labels that are mutually exclusive in aesthetics produce garments that work well with each other (even if it may just be in our heads). What I tend to do is simply concentrate of garment synergy, which is umm, my jargon for mixing and matching. I take pleasure in combining silhouettes, fabrics, textures and colours that complement each other to create looks that are often not achievable through a streamlined choice of labels. This outfit is an example of such exercise. The tunic is made of leather, the skirt linen and wool, the shoes cement. Put them together and they vaguely resemble a Roman-Japonaise peasant.

With the said I don’t see why one should worry about falling into the trap of caring about brand synergy. If you find yourself falling down the rabbit hole then simply enjoy the ride. Because at the end of the day they’re only clothes, something we should be having fun with.

Rick Owens via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

Rick Owens via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion
Wearing Rick Owens leather tunic; Comme des Garçons skirt and Margiela cement Tabis


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Gunslinger of The Apocalypse


November 5, 2014

by Gracia Ventus

Issey Miyake via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde FashionIssey Miyake via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion
Issey Miyake via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

I’m back to my all-black look, having gone astray somewhat with colours recently, a foray I’m quite keen to continue with. However black has always been a source of comfort, something I believe all my fellow black-clad, Rick/Ann/Yohji-loving soldiers would concur with. I think I can safely assume that black on the whole allows us to remain anonymous, to disappear into the crowd or hide in our own safe mental space. And I have always taken that for granted. Until one day when I asked an innocuous question to a group of people. Given the same coat from Rick Owens, one in all black, the other black and white, my fashion-inclined friends agreed that the latter was more conspicuous. When I asked another friend who has little interest in fashion, he felt that the all-black spoke louder, an opinion that threw me off guard. Have we then, in our attempt to stay hidden in our blackness, become more prominent? While I reckon we should reconsider the way we think of black vis-à-vis the rest of the world, there is no need for anyone to abandon their favourite colour. But let us not delude ourselves in thinking that we are ever more hidden amongst the crowds.

Issey-miyake-haat-4Issey Miyake via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion
Wearing some old hat; Issey Miyake Haat coat; DIY vest; Tricot Comme des Garçons wide-legged trousers which I’ve had professionally tapered; Damir Doma Falka creepers

Blackness aside, I would like to highlight another piece of garment from Issey Miyake, this time from one of his numerous sub-labels – HaaT. Just to recap from my previous post on Issey Miyake , the HaaT line is a mashup of modern technology with traditional textile craftsmanship which results in garments of artisanal qualities.

Like many of Issey Miyake’s creations, this coat is rather airy considering its length and material. Everything about the coat oozes subtlety, from the light texture that reflects light off its blackness, the curve towards the bottom, to the slight cocoon-like silhouette. These light touches allow for major layering fun while avoiding being overwrought.

Issey Miyake via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

To get the apocalyptic gunslinger look, one should don a wide brimmed hat and a high-necked wraparound of some sort. The higher the neckline, the more mystery you exude. Rather like preserving your chastity by keeping the ankles covered à la Victorian ladies. You can of course make a similar draped vest as mine, first featured here, inspired by Mika. Various styles of shoes would complement the look quite nicely, such examples include a pair of thick-soled Dr. Martens derbies, Underground creepers, or crepe-soled Grensons. With the outerwear and trousers I have taken the liberty to show a selection found from good old eBay.

For Men:


Long Coat Mafia via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

  1. Comme des Garçons Homme Black Wool Coat size M – from $150
  2. Lumen et Umbra Linen Coat with Split Vent Sz 48 – $429
  3. Issey Miyake Long Coat Size 3 – $325
  4. Comme des Garçons Homme Plus coat size M – $700
  5. Yohji Yamamoto Pants size 2 – $154
  6. Comme des Garçons Homme Plus Wool Pants size S from $90
  7. Comme des Garçons Homme Wide Pants Size S $89
  8. Comme des Garçons Homme Deux Pants Size S – $89
  9. Comme des Garçons Homme Pleated Wool Pants Size S – $99.9

For Women:


Long Coat Mafia via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

  1. Vintage 50’s Brocade Opera Coat – $119.99
  2. Vintage Swing Coat – $67.50
  3. Josie Natori Coat with Lace Hem – $79.99
  4. Comme des Garçons Tricot A-Line Coat size M from $148
  5. Yohji Yamamoto Wool Drop Crotch Trousers Size 1 – $198
  6. Comme des Garçons Wool Trousers size M from $195.99


There are of course plenty of other garments suitable to re-create this look, but the key points to watch out for is the flare of the coat, the taper of the trousers, and the high neckline. Most importantly, your trousers must have roomy pockets to hide your hands for maximum coolness, and that way your coat too will drift even higher in motion . I hope these suggestions have been useful in some ways. Till next time.


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Risk and Risqué


October 23, 2014

by Gracia Ventus

Yohji Yamamoto via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

Yohji Yamamoto via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde FashionYohji Yamamoto via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

Just a quick post to thank you guys for the thoughtful comments you’ve left on various posts. I will get to them as soon as real life gets less busy for me. In the meantime, here’s something more relaxed from Yohji Yamamoto’s Fall/Winter 2006 collection – one of my personal favourites of his – in which he celebrates the beauty of decollétage.

Wearing Yohji Yamamoto tweed jacket; Claudia Ligari wool trousers; Damir Doma creepers.


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A Night Out in Rick Owens


October 3, 2014

by Gracia Ventus

Rick Owens via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

I went out for a rather lavish dinner in town, having had the pleasure to be chauffeured to and fro by a good friend of mine. I don’t usually speak about the context of my outfits but I am making an exception this time. This was simply due to one thought that popped up in my head as I was passing a very pleasant evening. “The internet will not believe that I wore this outfit”, I murmured to my friend.

I know many of you are aware that I live in the tropics and hence do not have much opportunities to wear thick clothing. Several contributing factors on that evening allowed me to do so. One being optimal layering – the dress I wore underneath is sleeveless and very thin, so much so that if I were to wear nipple tapes they could be seen (yikes!). It’s also important the the coat I was wearing is extremely oversized, hence allowing for air circulation (wow can’t believe I said that about a Rick outerwear!). Two – I was constantly spending my time in air-conditioned environments in the evening. Three – and I always stress this time and time again, my body is highly acclimatised to heat (hence dealing very poorly in the cold, which I had spoken about here), especially my feet which have no problem being covered in boots and never seeing daylight when I’m outside.

On numerous occasions, inaccurate assumptions have been made about the lifestyles, environments and bodily functions of people on the internet. Hence sometimes I find myself having to explain about my abilities to wear the clothes I am showcasing on this blog sporadically. While I am okay with doing this, I am more concerned with my regular readers who have to read the same explanations over and over. To you, my dear internet friends, I do apologise. But sometimes I must do what is necessary to keep up with the so-called integrity and ‘authenticity’ of this blog (what is authenticity in the fashion blogging context anyway?!).

It also raises another fascinating subject in my head. How much of what bloggers wear in real life is influenced by the need to present their outfits on the blog? Has the need for staying true to one’s defined style portrayed on a blog put a parameter around what should/shouldn’t be worn in real life? For some reason authenticity is such an issue for many bloggers’ audience that time and time again when famous bloggers are spotted in real life, readers express disappointment that their outfits in ‘real life’ aren’t accurate representations of their virtual image. This issue is still at its infancy in my head. Perhaps as time goes by I can formulate it better. Of course I would, really, really, reaaaaally love to hear your thoughts on this and have a further discussion so I can actually write something substantial on this topic. Your observations, personal experiences, anecdotes, theory about other bloggers… Anything! You’re more than welcome to remain anonymous too.

Rick Owens via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

Rick Owens via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde FashionRick Owens via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion


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A Look Into Modern Issey Miyake


September 22, 2014

by Gracia Ventus

Issey Miyake via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

Issey Miyake via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde FashionIssey Miyake via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

Here’s another attempt to drum up some hype for Issey Miyake. The (niched) fashion blogsphere and tumblr are consistently filled to the brim with Rick Owens and Comme des Garçons, while male avant-garde fashion worshippers never fail to show their loyalty to Yohji Yamamoto in various fashion forums, strutting around in oversized bulbous pleated trousers and even larger overcoats reminiscent of the Forties . Meanwhile, Issey Miyake is left in the lurch, barely surfacing once in a while when the subjects of Japanese fashion history and fashion technology are broached.

While most of Issey Miyake’s Pleats Please garments are cut in a fuss-free pattern to fit and move with the body, once in a while this sub-label produces gravity-defying, architectural works. This dress, for example, moves beautifully in motion, especially as I was sauntering around Tokyo in the transitional summer/autumn weather. It bounces and flutters in the wind while retaining part of its structure, and combined with the shimmery surface they create the semblance of a mesmerising yet slightly monstrous liquid substance.

I did not realise how many diffusion lines Issey Miyake actually has until I was in Japan. Prior to my trip I knew about a few of them aside from the mainline and Pleats Please, such as:

  • Fête: a more sculptural version of Pleats Please, which has now been merged into the mainline since 2009
  • A-POC (A Piece of Cloth): No longer a line per se since mid-2000, it has now become a manufacturing method which is incorporated into the Pleats Please line, using computer technology to create clothing from a single piece of thread in a single process
  • HaaT: classic Issey Miyake garments such as oversized coats focusing on textile treatment with artisanal qualities
  • me Issey Miyake: shirts produced in colourful prints and patterns with pleated textures that differ from the Pleats Please line, again there is a focus on technology and innovation for this line
  • Bao Bao: Bags in tiled pattern


Then I discovered the Homme Plissé line for men, well when I say men there’s nothing to stop the ladies from wearing them, as I’ve found out personally how well the coats fit me. It’s a combined effort by the Issey Miyake Men design team with the Reality Lab team (which I will come to later). Basically the line is reminiscent of Pleats Please for men made out of sturdy waterproof techno fabrics. Photos of Homme Plissé items in store can be found here and here. I wish I had taken some photos in the store, as well as a particularly fascinating pleated cocoon coat from the EDGE series that I tried, but I was just too shy about it. So here are a couple of photos of the exact coat I’ve tried in grey. The fabric itself is rather difficult to describe. It has the characteristics of rubber with the texture of suede, extremely lightweight and certainly feels waterproof. Best of all it’s able to retain its beautiful pleats and silhouette.

Issey Miyake Homme Plisse EdgeIssey Miyake Homme Plisse Edge

Another notable line which I came across was 132.5 Issey Miyake. The designs are conceived with a computer scientist with the use of mathematical algorithm, and what was remarkable about the clothing was that they can all be folded flat like origami. Personally I am not too much of a fan of this line but it was most strikingly clever, what with all the calculative design and production methods which reminded me of how Tool carefully incorporates awkward time signatures in their music.

In short, all the lines that focus on textile innovations and productions (Homme Plissé, 132.5 Issey Miyake, Bao Bao etc) are the brainchild of Miyake’s Reality Lab, which also happens to be the name of one of the stores in Tokyo. The list of brands I have mentioned are by no means exhaustive, as yours truly is unable to keep up with all of them.

The sheer level of modern technology that Issey Miyake consistently relies on in its creations is certainly almost unmatched by most other luxury labels. Admittedly it may also be one of the reasons why it’s so difficult to keep up with the line. It seems like most of the capital has been sunk into research and development, instead of generating buzz to keep the consumers constantly informed of its presence. Having too many diffusion lines also may not help their cause. Not only are they spreading themselves too thin, most people will not be able to keep up with the various offerings. And when consumers get confused with too many options, they usually end up not being able to make up their mind, hence hampering the purchasing process altogether.

With that said, I hope this short article has shed some light on the tremendously fascinating clothing that Issey Miyake has to offer. The best part is, out of the three most esteemed Japanese labels, Issey Miyake tends to be the most affordable one, especially for the equally beautiful diffusion lines. The Homme Plissé coat that I tried in Tokyo cost a little over five hundred ‘Murican dollars, AND it’s actually very practical as it is a waterproof garment. Compared to Yohji’s jackets which on average is always above four figures, many of Issey Miyake’s items can be considered chump change.

Issey Miyake via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde FashionIssey Miyake via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion


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In Praise of Comme des Garçons SHIRT


September 15, 2014

by Gracia Ventus

Comme des Garçons via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

Comme des Garçons via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde FashionComme des Garçons via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion

Wearing Comme des Garcons SHIRT FW2009; Claudia Ligari trousers; Rick Owens geobaskets

Comme des Garçons SHIRT is, you guessed it, a line for shirts made primarily for men, alongside various easily palatable accessories such as belts and sneakers. The main selling points of the shirts are the quirky prints and graphic elements that make typical oxford shirts less boring. One can argue it’s not much more than a money-making machine à la CdG’s Play line, but I can appreciate some of the creativity that goes into many of these shirts, so much so that I bought a couple of them. I can’t say that everything’s a gem, but there have been notable printed shirts released in the past. It helps that there have been eye-catching campaigns done in the past that cemented its brand image.

Comme des Garçons via The Rosenrot | For The Love of Avant-Garde Fashion


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